What Are The Important Fuels For Exercise?

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates and fats are the two main fuels, though during prolonged intensive training bouts, proteins will play a more important role.  For instance, during the last stages of a marathon, when glycogen stores are exhausted, the proteins in muscles and organs may make up 10% of the body’s fuel mixture.

During a period of semi starvation or a low carbohydrate diet, glycogen would be in short supply so more proteins would be broken down to provide the body with fuel.  Up to half of the weight lost by someone following a very low calorie or low carbohydrate diet is likely to come from protein (mainly muscle loss).  Some people think that if they deplete their glycogen stores by following a low carbohydrate diet, they will force their body to break down more fat and lose weight.  This is not the case and this strategy will invariably lead to losing muscle and fat in equal amounts.

Carbohydrates during exercise?

After 60 minutes of moderate to high exercise, most muscle glycogen will be used up, and the body will have to rely more on blood sugar.  After 2 – 3 hours the body will be relying totally on blood sugar (and fats and proteins from muscle).  Therefore when exercising for more than 60 minutes, consuming carbohydrate during a workout will help to delay fatigue and allow performance at a higher level for longer.

An intake of between 30 – 60g (120 – 240 kcals) of carbs per hour is recommended, as this is the maximum amount that can be taken up by the muscles, and so consuming more will not produce beneficial results.  It is also important to start consuming carbs before fatigue sets in, as it can take 30 mins for the glucose to enter the blood stream.

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REPs Clinical Nutrition – Discovery Learning

If you are an Instructor or Personal Fitness Trainer wishing to expand your knowledge in the field of Clinical Nutrition or want to specialise in supporting a client to choose a more balanced diet, then this short course could be exactly what you are looking for. This unique REPs accredited Clinical Nutrition course is designed to offer you the most practical, effective and up to date approach to working with your clients to enhance their wellbeing through nutrition. The literature review provided is also essential reading for other health professionals to consolidate their understanding of nutrition and chronic disease. The tutorial day provides an opportunity to further develop skills and knowledge.

Understanding the background of nutrition for the prevention of chronic disease is essential for reducing the risk lifestyle disease. This course blends an academic evidence base about how food and nutrients affect the risk of lifestyle diseases with a simple and practical application. Essential for anyone working on an Exercise Referral scheme. The course is written and developed by a highly experienced Registered Nutritionist and Registered Dietitian, its evidenced based conclusions are straightforward clear and remit specific.

Clinical Nutrition Course Format:

20 hours pre course reading, followed by 1 day attendance (8 hours)

The course will cover the following conditions:

Clinical Nutrition conditions covered:
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Dyslipidaemia
  • Arthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Gastrointestinal health
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Menopause
Clinical Nutrition Course Content:
  • Living with a long term disease
  • The National Diet and Nutrition survey, what people are really eating
  • The diet of Minority Ethnic Groups
  • The conditions
  • Working with clients
  • The Eatwell plate, how to apply it
  • Helping a client choose their balanced diet
  • How to promote diets to help prevent a particular conditions

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Why And How Do We Put On Weight? – Discovery UK

Our body likes to keep things in balance and there is little doubt that regulation of bodyweight occurs, albeit with varying degrees of precision! Being overweight or obese is often considered to result from the failure of homeostatic mechanisms that regulate body weight during exposure to an environment that favours overeating and or discourages physical activity.

It is also important to emphasise that a fluctuating body weight is the general rule, even in adults who apparently maintain a stable body weight over months, years and decades, there is in reality no absolute constancy of bodyweight.  Instead, body weight tends to fluctuate or oscillate around a mean constant value, with small to large deviations from a ‘set’ or ‘preferred’ value. This is triggered by events that are seasonal and or cultural (weekends, holidays etc), psychological (stress, depression, anxiety or emotions) and pathological (ranging from minor health perturbations to more serious disease states).

Set point theory

The set point theory;  fat cells have a form of homeostatic control over body weight, is perhaps the most plausible explanation for long-term body stores. Set point theory states that each of us has a genetically pre-programmed set weight point that our bodies would prefer to maintain under normal circumstances. A hormone called leptin which is our natural appetite suppressant  is produced in the adipocyte and is responsible for appetite and bodyweight control.  As fat cells become full they increase production of leptin which leads to a reduction in appetite.  However most people don’t respond to appetite that well but instead are susceptible to marketing, ubiquitous snacks and the social and environmental pressures that make us all eat more than we should.  Chronic overeating will lead to a situation of leptin resistance at which point, hunger is always present.  This is part of the vicious cycle of weight gain that is not fully understood.

The existence of this set point explains why most diets don’t work – they are too short term in their approach to changing weight and simply lead to a temporary shrinking of the fat cell which leads to adiposity rebound. While the obese individual can fight off the impulse to eat for a time (lower levels of leptin), eventually the signal becomes too strong to ignore. The result is rebound overeating with individuals often exceeding their previous weight.

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Sports Nutrition Course at Discovery UK

If you are a sports coach or physical trainer then this course you will find to be indispensable. If you are an Instructor or Personal Trainer wishing to expand your expertise or to specialise in sports nutrition, then this short course could be exactly what you are looking for. This unique REPs accredited level 2 Sports Nutrition Course is designed to offer you the most practical and effective approach to working with your clients to enhance their sports performance through improved and targeted apporaches to nutrition.
Understanding the rudiments of Sports Nutrition is essential for PT’s in order that they can achieve optimum results for their clients.  This REP’s certificate will also allow personal trainers and sports coaches to expand their client base and branch out into working with sports clubs and recreational athletes that are outside of their normal range of expertise. The course is not highly theoretical and has been put together by nutritionists working with experienced sports coaches to deliver a highly practical and realistic approach for the Personal Trainer and Sports Coach.

This REPs Sports Nutrition course is essential for any sports coach or PT working with clients to improve Personal Bests or general performance, particularly for those clients that have hit a ceiling in terms of their strength and endurance exercise or skill based training.  With the practical skills and knowledge provided you will be able to move their performance forward both during their training and on competition day, and the structure and approach that you will deploy will be straight forward and highly manageable for the client.  Why not call now to speak to a tutor to learn more about this course.  Call 020 8543 1017 and ask for one of the Sports Nutrition Tutors to give you a call.

Sports Nutrition Course Content:
  • Short theoretical introduction
  • The main energy systems, phosphagen, anaerobic and aerobic
  • Energy production and storage
  • Fuel and substrate utilisation

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Who didn’t love Sports Day?

As the end of a school year starts to come to a close I start seeing more and more posts all over social networking sites regarding a certain day that I certainly loved as a child at school……sports day!

For most of us it was a day where you didn’t have to sit and write pages and pages whilst listening to your teacher without making a sound. It was a day where you could be as loud as you can, shouting and cheering for your friends, spend all day outside playing sport and taking part in athletics races. With all this in mind though, from what I have been reading, it seems like the adults are more excited than the kids. Could this be down to how our society and health awareness has changed?

Unfortunately over the past few years there has been much debate over sports day in many schools across the country. Some saying it’s a bad idea, some banning the day all together and some taking away the individual races so that the competition is taken out of the day. Now finally this year it seems like there is more influence and activity going on in schools probably due to the fact that we will be opening the Olympic Games in less than a month’s time….but is it too late???

Recent studies conducted on children between the ages of 8 and 10 have shown that the majority of these children are only partaking in 20 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a day. Which is way below the recommended 60 minutes. This 20 minutes accounts for only 4% of their waking time. It was also mentioned that girls activity levels were even less than boys.
We all know that as we get a little older and we move further into our teenage years that the majority of us tend to see a decrease in activity levels. This begs the question though that if at the ages of 8 and 10 we are only spending 4% of our waking time being active, can it actually get much lower?

This research has suggested how important it is for parents and schools alike to take responsibility of getting more children involved in sport, in particular girls. I’m sure that with the likes of Wimbledon, the European championships and the Olympic games, this summer will not be much of an issue getting kids active. However, will these activity levels continue once these events come to a close for another year?!

If your interested in improving the health and wellness of children then why not take a look at our Level 2 Children’s Exercise and Obesity Instructor course.

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